The Good Ship Jesus | The Beginning of the Slave Trade

Jesus of Lubeck (Name of first Slave Ship to Grace the America's.)

Jesus of Lubeck (Name of first Slave Ship to Grace the America’s.)

What has come to be referred to as “The Good Ship Jesus” was in fact the “Jesus of Lubeck,” a 700-ton ship purchased by King Henry VIII from the Hanseatic League, a merchant alliance between the cities of Hamburg and Lubeck in Germany. Twenty years after its purchase the ship, in disrepair, was lent to Sir John Hawkins by Queen Elizabeth.

Hawkins, a cousin of Sir Francis Drake, was granted permission from Queen Elizabeth for his first voyage in 1562. He was allowed to carry Africans to the Americas “with their own free consent” and he agreed to this condition. Hawkins had a reputation for being a religious man who required his crew to “serve God daily” and to love one another. Sir Francis Drake accompanied Hawkins on this voyage and subsequent others. Drake, was himself, devoutly religious. Services were held on board twice a day.

Off the coast of Africa, near Sierra Leone, Hawkins captured 300-500 slaves, mostly by plundering Portuguese ships, but also through violence and subterfuge promising Africans free land and riches in the new world. He sold most of the slaves in what is now known as the Dominican Republic. He returned home with a profit and ships laden with ivory, hides, and sugar. Thus began the slave trade.

Admiral, Slaver John Hawkins

Admiral, Slaver John Hawkins

Admiral John Hawkins is often remembered as one of the greatest men in the early English navy. Along with his cousin and companion Sir Francis Drake, he helped defeat the Spanish Armada and cement England’s role as ruler of the seas. But like most men who fell under the category of “Sea Dogs”, his career was filled with a blood-thirsty ruthlessness far removed from the modern ideas of heroes.

More Reading on John Hawkins and His “Crusades” Here: http://www.chroniclesofamerica.com/sea-dogs/john_hawkins_slavers_gentlemen_pirates.htm

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “The Good Ship Jesus | The Beginning of the Slave Trade

  1. Renisha McBride, the 19-year-old so-called African-American shot by a evil so-called white homeowner on his front porch as she sought help after a car accident in a Detroit suburb, was buried as a result of the tragedy. The so-called Black community are angrily calling on authorities to arrest and charge her assailant. The so-called white man that killed her is still free. When will you so-called blacks wake up and come to the realization that you have a mortal enemy. If you be a good boy or gal in a sub servant position you may be tolerated until your usefulness has expired. Or you might be shot in the head if you go to the so-called whites for help and they feel the need to kill a ni**er that day. God is angry and wants you to repent quickly because he is about to bring a destruction on the nations that has done such wicked ills to his people. As you watch this video let it not be for entertainment but to call you to repentance because God will get you as well unless you repent quickly

    They are comparing McBride’s death to the shooting death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin, 17, whose killer George Zimmerman was not arrested for months after the incident. The case also has similarities to the shooting death of 24-year-old Jonathan Ferrell, a former football player at Florida A&M, who was gunned down by Charlotte, N.C., police when he approached the officers for help after his car hit a tree. That incident was prompted by a woman who called 911 and told dispatchers a man was trying to break into her home because Ferrell had been knocking on her door repeatedly seeking help. When will you realize that friends do not kill other friends that seek help? Enemies that hate you will gun you down and consider it justifiable homicide and then go and have dinner. That’s is real talk

    Like

  2. King James Bible – The History
    The King James Bible, published in 1611, was England’s authorized version of the Bible translated from the original Hebrew and Greek languages into English at the request of King James I of England. At the time, other English Bibles existed, but King James did not like the most popular translation, the Geneva Bible, because he felt that some of the marginal notes encouraged disobedience to kings. So when a Puritan scholar, Dr. John Reynolds, suggested a new English translation of the Bible at a 1604 conference of bishops and theologians at Hampton Court Palace, King James readily agreed. By June of 1604, fifty-four of England’s foremost scholars and linguists were formed into six panels to translate particular groups of Old Testament and New Testament books and the Aprocrypha (the Aprocrypha was dropped from later editions) into English. Even though King James agreed to the new Bible translation, and the translators dedicated their work “to the most high and mighty prince James,” the King James Version was never officially recognized by the king, nor was it ever authorized as the only text permitted to be read in church. Despite this, it soon replaced both the Bishops’ Bible and the Geneva Bible in popularity and became the leading text for private use.
    King James Bible – The Translators
    Of the original 54 men chosen to translate the King James Bible, only 47 finished the more than seven-year project, which was governed by very strict rules of translation. The translators were scholarly men who were experts in the biblical languages, and they were convinced of the inerrancy and authority of Scripture. Dr. Henry M. Morris, President of the Institute for Creation Research, said of these men, “It is almost certain that no group of Bible scholars before or since has ever been as thoroughly fit for their task as was the King James Translation Team.”

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s